UTHN meeting of 11/5/19

UTHN members (missing Cyndi Bowen and Laurel Wright)

Present:  Keri Kammerman, Kristin Rogers-Iverson, Kris Watts, Angela Scothern, Kate Dougherty, Tamara Oswald, Kinsey McNevin, Pam Archbold, Tristan Adair, Peggy Cann, Heidi Jaeger

I.Tamara Oswald presented on Harp Care and Maintenance

Some background on Tamara.  Tamara has been playing harp for more years than she appears old enough to have accomplished. She began studying harp at the age of 7 after a year of piano studies. At the age of 13 Tamara soloed with the Utah symphony and again at age 14 and 16-once on piano. She received her degree in harp performance at the University of Southern California under the direction of Susann McDonald. Most of us are aware that Tamara is the principal harpist for the Tabernacle Choir at Temple Square and tours all over the world with this group. She is also a member of the Oswald-Goeckeritz duo with Jeannine Goeckeritz (see www.harpandflute.com). Together, they have played all over the US and in Europe and have recorded a CD.called Chanson.  Tamara met her husband Dan in Zurich when her parents were called to oversee the missionary work in Switzerland for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. Her husband Daniel is the honorary consul of Switzerland to Utah. They are the proud parents of 6 children and 15 grandchildren.  Tamara was certified by the Clinical Musician Certification Program/Harp for Healing (CMCP) in 2017 and has been employed by Brighton/Bristol Hospice since then. Please visit her website www.harpandflute.com for more information.

In doing an online search for information on Tamara I also found the following review of her work:

The flowing style and graceful virtuosity of Tamara Oswald has been enjoyed by audiences across the world. She has performed with the Zurich Tonhalle Orchestra under the direction of such renowned musicians as Christoph Eschenbach and M. Rstropovich, and as a soloist with the Tuttlingen Jugend Orchestra in Germany. Nationally, she has performed with the Pasadena, Long Beach and the Honolulu Symphonies, and as a soloist with the Santa Monica Symphony, the University of Southern California, University of Utah, the Orchestra at Temple Square, Utah Chamber Artists and the Utah Symphony. She has been the recipient of esteemed musical awards from the American Harp Society and has competed as a semi-finalist at both the Israeli and Rome International Harp competitions.

Oswald was principal harp for Ballet West for 20 years. She continues to perform regularly with the Utah Chamber Artists, now in their 29th year, and has also been affiliated with the Utah Symphony, Utah Opera, Utah Chamber Festival, Salt Lake Choral Artists, and the Park City Music Festival. She has had the opportunity to perform with such luminaries as Julius Baker, Roberta Peters, Robert Shaw, Dale Warland, Jubilant Sykes, and Ida Haendel.”   http://www.harpandflute.com/about-us/tamara-oswald/

Peggy was kind enough to send us the link to listen to Tamara accompany Sissel recently with the Tabernacle Choir at Temple Square:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EFe84U__kt8

Tamara prepared a handout for us all which we referred to during her discussion. I will not copy the handout but will include some things mentioned that I found new information or a good reminder:

Harp History from ancient to modern times. While harps are an ancient instrument probably developed based on the bow and arrow, the modern use of the harp as a solo instrument did not develop until the 1600s. There was no way to adjust for sharps or flats until the 16 century when hooks were added to create C# and F#. In the earliest days, the harp was used to accompany songs, in groups with other instruments and voice. There wasn’t solo music for the harp until the 1600s. Pedals were not developed until the 18th century. 

The modern Troubador Harp was invented by Samual Pratt of Utah in 1960. From both marriages of Sam and resulting children the Pratt family have been influential in the modern lever harp movement., Carl Pratt (801) 377-7082, Sam’s son,  is an excellent local harp builder and technician if your harp needs some work.

Pedal harp strings should be reserved for pedal harps and not put on a lever harp except for the Lyon and Healey lever harps.  They require too much tension and may break the harp. When ordering replacement strings, you must specify the Harp maker, string composition (gut, nylon, wire, fluorocarbon), octave and note. 1st octave starts at the top and works down. (On a Troubador Harp, that would be E to F).  Be consistent with whatever the harp maker recommends.  A source for string sets is  D. Kolacny in Colorado (303) 722-6081.  Replace broken strings as quickly as possible as too much pressure resulting from the broken string will cause the neighbor strings to also break.

Dust covers are not required except for moving harps.  Keep it exposed,, dust as needed and play it daily.  If storage is required of the harp, the strings may be lowered a tone or so but don’t relax them completely. Avoid knocking over the harp.

Cleaning:  A slightly damp cloth with a little mild soap will do (no detergents). Clean a small area at a time and dry it. Avoid using too much water as it could get into the glued joints.  Black scuff marks can be removed with a little benzene.  If desired, a commercial polish designed specifically for harps may be used.  Polish is not really necessary though.

Tuning: Tamara demonstrated how she tunes her pedal harp for playing in an orchestra starting with A. checking it with the 4th note below (E) then the 5th below (D) then the 4th string above A (D) and then the Octave (A to A) repeating this for every note even when an electronic tuner is used.  When playing with the orchestra, Tamara tunes to 441 a bit higher as the stringed instruments tend to sharpen as they are played. Woodwinds tend to flatten. Tamara recommends tuning in Natural (C maj) although many orchestral harpists tune in the flat position of the harp.

Replacing Strings: Tamara provided a diagram for knotting harp strings and discussed situations where harp strings had broken in the middle of her performances and how she dealt with that.  Also how to look for potential breaking points and changing weak looking strings before they break. Good idea to date string packets when they are used in case of breakage right away.  Most string companies will replace the string if it breaks within the first week of use.

Dealing with pain:  resting an 80 lb. harp on your shoulder in an unnatural position, moving harps, loading harps into cars  is likely going to result in pain as we age.  Tamara recommends practicing harp in the right size chair for your body and the harp and using a chair with a good back on it, not a bench, at least for practice.   Only play for 45 minutes at a time and then take a break,, stretch before and after playing.  Tamara uses a pain relief cream product called Real Time Pain Relief. There is Physical Therapy specifically designed for harpists as well as ergonomic training to preserve the body. 

II. We each presented and played some of our favorite holiday music.

Kris Watts played for us and shared sheet music she has orchestrated for Silent Night.  Pam and Heidi played a duet of Pachabel’s Canon mashup with The First Noel, Kristen played a piece she had composed for the upcoming funeral of a dear friend that was contemplative and beautiful.  She was looking for feedback from the group which was provided.  Tristan improvised and sang     Away In the Manger,  Tamara played a version of In the Bleak Midwinter from Sunita Stanislow’s Christmas Eve book, Kinsey played Infant Holy, Peggy helped Heidi play Jingle Bells using only a bass pattern and singing the song to help her work on harp accompaniment for song.  Thankfully the group sang while Peggy pointed to the chords. 

We closed the meeting and shared  a light lunch potluck (always great food!) and casual conversation.  

We agreed to not meet in December but have a casual harp circle at Pam Archbolds house on a Saturday morning for those who can make it.  Next meeting will be in January.  

UTHN Meeting April 23, 2019


UTHN Meeting April 23, 2019 held at Kristen’s house

Attendees:  Kristen, Peggy, Laurel, Cindi Chris, Kate, Angela, Heidi, Tristan

Today was Tristan’s and Chris’s birthday which we celebrated with good food and a potluck lunch.

I: Heidi Reviewed the Generations 2019 conference Music Therapy Track held 4/16/19 at the Salt Palace Convention Center; Peggy, Tamara, Pam and Heidi attended and Peggy presented: 

Conference Session I: A Continuum of Music in Healthcare: From Music Listening to Music therapy

Presenters: E. Christensen, SCMT, MT-BC; P Cann, CMP; S Cheek-O’Donnell, PhD; M. Frani, PhD; M , Hearns, PhD

Massamiliano Frani, PhD is the CEO of Genote  see www.genotelab.com, recorded music to achieve various outcomes working with specific populations. He graciously offered attendees a 2 month free trial if we email him and mention his offer at this conference. He discussed his research using his product with long distance runners and the effect it had on their Ck, Hb, Cortisol, and Testosterone levels. Statistically significant results include an decrease of Ck and increase of testosterone and better motivational and coping skills.  See Youtube videos for more information   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCm4tiXyX_axzIq1Ty9q7eYA

I’m not sure when this discussion came up but the reference is to an article about a Therapeutic Musician who plays the harp. See the article   http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/12/19/AR2008121903041.html?referrer=emailarticle&noredirect=on

Sydney Cheek-O’Donnell, PhD, Assoc Dean for Research at UU

Discussed Time Slips, a storytelling method to work with Dementia patients. TimeSlips opens storytelling to everyone by replacing the pressure to remember with the freedom to imagine. The open, poetic language of improvisational storytelling invites people with dementia to express themselves and connect with others. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yxxbw7YIys

The UU has an Arts In Health Innovation lab, free yoga at the UMFA for the public and recently produced a play about a blind woman called Molly Sweeney

There will be an Arts in Health Symposium at the UU in the Fall of 2019, see http://artsinhealth.utah.edu/

Maureen Hearns, PhD, Chair of the Music Therapy Dept. at Utah State University, Logan

Music therapy In Dementia Care:

  • Music therapy provides opportunities for:
  • Memory Recall which contributes to reminiscence and satisfaction with life
  • Positive Changes in Mood and emotional states
  • Sense of Control Over Life through successful experiences
  • Awareness of self and environment which accompanies increased attention to music
  • Anxiety and stress reduction for older adults and caregivers
  • Nonpharmacological management of pain and discomfort
  • Stimulation which provokes interest even when no other approach is effective
  • Structure which promotes rhythmic and continuous movement or vocal fluency as an adjunct to physical rehabilitation
  • Emotional intimacy when spouses and families share creative music experiences
  • Social interaction with caregivers and families

Peggy Cann, CMP gave a great presentation on what Therapeutic Musicians do and demonstrated by playing the harp for the group as she would for the NICU patients she plays for. She discussed the differences between Music Therapists and Therapeutic Musicians training and scope of practice. 

Session II:  Music therapy in Utah: Current Trends, Reimbursement and More

Presenter: Emily Polichette, MM, SCMT, MT-BC

MTs can bill for restorative care if their work is in support of other outcomes.  They need an MD to sign off on this.

If insurance companies deny billing, ask to see their exclusion policies.

Utah Association of Music Therapists  has a group devoted to legislative lobbying and they are always trying to get more billable services approved by Medicare/Medicaid See Utah State HB 277 which created the designation of State Certified Music therapist (SCMT).  Only MT-BC people can apply for SCMT certification.

The term “Music Therapist” is not owned exclusively by BC-MTs which is one reason why they pushed for HB 277.  It is important for the public to understand the difference between music therapists and Board Certified Music Therapists. One difference is in the amount of training and internship hours BC-MTs receive versus other certification programs.

Session III:  Music and Mental Health in the Medical Settings

Presenter: Heather Fellows, SCMT, MT-BC

An experiential session.  We all took up instruments, drums, guitars, and played together.  Heather and some of the other Music Therapists present sang. Heather provided stories of her 20 years of practice as BC-MT working with all kinds of patients and how she used music, usually guitar and voice, to hold space for patients.

References: 

  • Group Music Listening with Adolescents for Self-Expression in Grief Recovery (McFerran, 2011)
  • Active music making, songwriting and analysis, and music assisted grief rituals with hospice workers (Wiodarczk, 2010)
  • Singing and vocal improvisation with adults with mental illness in complicated grief (IIliya, 2015)
  • Live Music Based experiences improved pain control, physical comfort and relaxation in terminally ill hospice patients (Krout, 2001)

 Heather told a story about a family member of a terminally ill patient who requested she play and sing Charley Puth’s song, See You Again. 

Session IV: the Power of Your Individual Voice: Songwriting and Voice in Music therapy

Presenter: Brandtley Henderson, MM, MT-BC

Why we sing:  Everybody can do it!

Muisc can create and reinforce neural pathways.

Singing is a way to create a shortcut from the prefrontal cortex (decision making) to the amygdala (emotional processing).

Singing permits the individual to acknowledge and process emotion in a way that is engaging, accessible, and non-threatening.

Another experiential session. Everybody can sing who can breath and make any sort of vibrational noise from their throat. You don’t have to be a trained singer. Brandtley  played guitar and sang songs and had us all write a song in 15 minutes as a group which we then sang.  It was pretty easy to do actually:  pick a rhythm, create a phrase about a preselected topic, attach the phrase to a melody.  Sing.  Brandtley works with the Utah State Hospital patients.  

II. We were all requested to watch the TED talk You Are Contagious by Vanessa Van Edwards

https://www.google.com/search?q=ted+talk+you+are+contagious&rlz=1C1LOQA_enUS668US681&oq=TED+talk+You+Are+&aqs=chrome.0.0j69i57j0l4.6794j0j8&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

and listen to the podcasts: 

End of Life University  Dr Karen Wyatt  Mortal Wisdom

Episodes:

181  Impermanence

183 How to let go of what you thought should happen

167 Kathryn De Longi and Music Thanatology  (Kathryn is Kristen’s cousin and inspiration).

Using these sources as inspiration we talked about our own experiences when we were not centered and focused on our patients and the effect that had (or did not have) lending support to the concept that our intention and mindfulness is critical to the work we do.

We discussed the importance of focusing on gratitude as a way of improving not only our own emotional and physical health but that of others around us and how HeartMath measures and encourages this practice of cardiac coherence.

Cindi quoted: “Gratitude allows grace to complete it’s cycle”  I cannot find the source for this citation but I did find the following via google search:  https://mentalhealthgracealliance.org/christian-mental-health-and-mental-illness/what-you-get-when-you-give-thanks

Tristan shared an experience she had recently of an estranged family coming together at the bedside of their dying loved one and how the music helped them heal at this critical time before their loved one passed.

We also shared experiences of how times of brokenness can allow us to utilize other gifts we have to make a positive impact on the world in spite of our own disabilities and limitations. Laurel shared her experience from living with a chronic illness for the last 25 years and finding gratitude for all the blessings of her life.

We finished with lunch together and a healing ritual for one of our members using harp, intention and holding space for support.